ESL Presentation: A Business, Charity, or Organization

Please check out my older post on presentations for an overview of how I usually teach them.

This post will describe a presentation that I did with my class during the same unit that I described in my last post. We studied different types of businesses and organizations throughout the unit. For their final project, they had to give a presentation about an organization that they were interested in.

The premise was that they were spokespeople for their chosen company or charity and the rest of the class were wealthy investors/donators who had $100,000 to donate or invest. The student who raised the largest amount of money for their organization would be the winner.

Here’s how I did it.

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Listening Activity: Instagram Podcast (How I Built This)

For other listening ideas, check out my older blog posts on my favorite listening resources and how I teach listening in class.

This post includes a listening activity for upper intermediate or advanced ESL students.

This topic should be relevant, interesting, and approachable for most adult students. Even if the students in your class aren’t preparing to be “businessmen/women” or CEOs, they’ll gain some vocabulary and listening strategies that will help them in whatever field they’re planning on entering.

I created this activity for my class this past semester. We used the Pathways 3 textbook (which I recommend) and I taught these activities in Unit 5: Making a Living, Making a Difference.

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Teaching Trump: Two Listenings

The election is finally over. Whether you like it or not, Donald Trump was elected president of the United States. He’s a person who many of my ESL students were very interested in talking about and learning about, so I’ve given a few assignments about him.

In this post, you’ll find two videos I’ve used in my classes and the worksheet and quiz that goes with them.

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3 Magic Moments in Language Learning (and why ESL teachers need to learn languages too)

Like most ESL teachers, I love learning languages just as much as I love teaching my mother tongue. Most of my colleagues are similar: I haven’t met too many monolingual ESL teachers.

Spanish has been my most recent language learning pursuit. I have a little background in the language from four years of high school and a semester in college, but I’m not fluent by any means. So for the past few months, I’ve been teaching myself. It’s been challenging and fun.

But it’s also given me the chance to go through the language learning experience again, the same experience all my students are going through. In this article, I’ll describe three specific language learning moments, and what they taught me to remember as a language teacher.

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My Favorite ESL Listening Resources

My last post gave a run-down of how I teach listening in class.

I wrote briefly about authentic listening material and why it’s so important. This post is a collection of different sources and examples of listening materials that I think work the best for in ESL classes.

First, I’ll go through examples of listening materials I use in class.

Then we’ll look at resources that you can use to give your students outside of class listening homework.

Finally, I’ll talk about my favorite listening textbooks out of the ones I’ve used.

Let’s get started

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6 Teaching Tips from Fluent Forever.

I’ve been reading books with the word “fluent” in the title. First, I reviewed Becoming Fluent. Then Fluent in 3 Months.

This time, I’m looking at Fluent Forever, a book by Gabriel Wyner, who was an opera singer before he became a polyglot and language hacker.

Like the first two I reviewed, this book is aimed at adults who are thinking about learning a foreign language. And again, I’m going to be reversing the point of view and looking at how it can be applied to teaching English as a foreign language.

So let’s take a look at the aspects of this book that are useful for ESL teachers.

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3 Ways You Can Use VIRTUAL REALITY in Your ESL Class!

Virtual reality is here and it’s only going to get bigger and bigger in the next few years.

If you don’t know much about virtual reality and don’t believe me, go to YouTube on your smartphone and search for “360 VR” (360 degrees, virtual reality). Choose a video that looks interesting and start watching, but move your phone around. That’s right: you’re controlling where the camera goes.

Now, that’s cool. But can you use VR to teach? I’m sure there’s going to be tons of apps and equipment hitting the markets, but you can already do some activities in class with VR that’s already available, and you won’t have to spend more than $20.

Introducing: Google Cardboard.

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